How the Mac App Store Will Advance the Social Media Agenda

I’m sure you’ve heard by now about the app store that Apple has launched for Macs. It allows you to run your favorites iPhone apps right on your desktop. They have managed to take the brilliant “I always have something to entertain me” mentality of the iPhone, and put it where you want it most, on your computer, where most of us spend our days. Now I personally came up with idea months ago while sitting in my room wishing I could play Angry Birds on my Mac, but I guess that’s beside the point. With the new App store for the Mac you can now spend your free time playing Sudoku, or tweeting about this and that, or even planning your week’s outfits using the Dress Assistant App.

Now, apart from the frivolities offered by the numerous apps available, there is also excitement amongst social media enthusiasts everywhere. This new Apple creation offers the next significant advancement of the social media agenda. They now, or soon will, take all your favorite sites and social media pages, and make them stationary on your desktop. Once there they will come alive and turn your computer into a living organism; constantly updating and breathing all of the social media you love. It will become a friend, that tells you everything you want to know when you want to know it. You will not be able to live without it.

This preposition, from a marketing standpoint, offers advertisers an ideal scenario. Consider this:  You are sitting at your computer at work, it has been a long day, and you have settled into the work/surf-the-web part of your day. You have your work computer set up with all of your favorite pages, in app form, scattered across your desktop. Needing a break, you decide to sit back and watch all of these pages deliver to you any and all information you want to know. You relax as you find comfort in the latest funny tweet from Steve Martin , or a reassuring Facebook post from your mother, and you are once again at peace.

Now, as an advertiser, this presents you with an opportunity to create content for these apps and have them delivered to a curious, and captive audience at all times of the day, and at locations, (like at work for example) that you normally couldn’t reach them. Also, the Mac Apps offer another benefit; they offer the customizability, and specificity of iPhone apps without the limitations that the small phone has. I know, for me personally, I hate the ads on my phone for two reasons: first, they always show up at the most inopportune times, and second, they take up half of my screen. It is for these reasons, along with the fact that the screen is too small to do much meaningful web browsing, that I refuse to follow any of the links in the ads. This shouldn’t be nearly as much of a problem with the Mac Apps, just as long as they don’t make me sit through 20 second, full page, ads for a weight loss drug while I’m waiting for Angry Birds to load.

The Mac App store is truly a genius idea that will, like the apps on the iPhone, change the way we interact with the world, and the way the world interacts with us. It’s still in it’s infancy but I know that it will expand rapidly, and I’m excited to see where it goes from here.

Windows 8 – Fact or Fiction

What do facial recognition and faster start-up times have in common? According to Sydney Hill at TechNewsWorld, they may be the newest features in Microsoft’s plan for an operating system rumored to be called Windows 8. Earlier this week powerpoint slides detailing the operating system and its features were leaked to the public. Among the most talked about slides were ones which discussed the company’s goal of eliminating its long running problem of slow start-up times, and adding new cutting age technology which would allow for facial recognition.In addition, the slides mentioned Apple’s success in identifying with customers to build brand recognition and loyalty. However, at this point, the rumors have yet to be confirmed by Microsoft; which leads many to question the authenticity of the claims.

“The only way we will ever know if these slides are authentic is if Microsoft comes out and says they are — and that’s not likely to happen,” said Michael Cherry, vice president of research, operating systems, with the independent analyst firm Directions on Microsoft.

“I’m quite confident these are the real deal,” said Stephen Chapman, Microsoft Kitchen site operator. “I just feel bad for the poor sap who either leaked these or inadvertently shared these with the world.”

Only time, and Microsoft, will tell whether there is any truth behind the recently leaked slides. PC users around the world can only hope that Bill Gates won’t keep them in the dark for long.