Twitter vs. Instagram: A War on Pictures

By now most of you have heard of the ongoing feud between Instagram and Twitter, but incase you haven’t been keeping up I’ll break it down for you. It all started this spring:

April 
Facebook makes offer to purchase Instagram for $1 billion.

August
On the 14th the Office of Fair Trading approves the deal, while the Federal Trade Commission closes their investigation concerning the deal on the 22nd.

September
The deal between Instagram and Facebook officially closes on the 6th and Instagram surpasses Twitter in daily active mobile users.

November
Twitter, who attempted to purchase Instagram, announces they will be releasing their own range of photo filters in the coming months.

Now, just last week Instagram photos on Twitter were appearing oddly cropped and yesterday Instagram photos have completely disappeared, though, they can still be viewed through the URL of the original tweet. Obviously many social media users are starting to express their frustration, but it will be interesting to see how users respond in the coming months after Twitter releases their photo filters. Will people begin to choose one network over the other and how will the digital agency respond to the change?

Have you heard of Threadlife?

Threadlife is the newest mobile video sharing app to hit the scene, created by former Zappos CEO Nick Swimurn and creative guru Ken Martin. Surprisingly, there is still a void in social media for practical mobile video sharing. Apps such as Viddy and Socialcam have tried to fill it, but neither have been able to take off in a big way.  Swimurn and Martin are hoping for Threadlife becomes the Twitter or Instagram of video sharing.

What makes Threadlife different from previous attempts is the three second video limit, called stitches. Users create three second videos and “stitch” them together to create a video montage, called threads. Because the stitches are short and sweet the videos don’t become drawn-out and viewers are less likely to lose interest. Also, instead of profile pictures, the app requires three-second profile videos. In the future, the Threadlife team plans to include tagging and location-specific information.

Only time will tell if Threadlife will take off with mobile users, but I can already see the potential the social media agency could take advantage of. How do you see Threadlife faring against previous mobile video sharing apps? Do you see yourself using it?

Facebook and your job search.

Would you ever use a Facebook job search platform? For a while now its been rumored that Facebook is considering starting their own job search platform, but I doubt many people would use it. Especially when a professional networking site already exists, LinkedIn, and you can already search for jobs on there. Most people should keep their Facebook profile completely separated from their job search; unless, of course, you’re applying for a job at social media agency or digital marketing firm. If this is the case, keep it appropriate because many employers use Facebook to look up job candidates for reasons why they shouldn’t hire them.

If you think your Facebook profile is hurting your chances of being hired for a job you have two options. First option, you can censor what pictures you allow yourself to be tagged in and what friends can post on your wall through your privacy settings. On top of that, make sure you’re not posting anything inappropriate or too political; if you’re friends with your grandma on Facebook then you’re probably good. Second option, you can leave your profile the same and make it completely private. In your privacy settings profiles can be made searchable and unable to view by anyone who is not a “friend”.

LinkedIn is your best bet for professional networking, but take the precautions stated above. If a potential employer decides to search you online you don’t want them to see or read anything that could hinder your chances of being hired.

I Fought the Law and Social Media Won

We’ve all heard the warnings to be conscientious about what we decide to post on our social networks. Personally, I just make sure I don’t post anything that my grandma won’t like. But it seems more and more people are running into trouble with the law because of what they’ve posted on their pages. Last month there were two separate cases of Twitter users threatening President Obama. One was a teenage girl who is being investigated by the Secret Service and the other was an adult male who was arrested. Another teenage girl maybe in trouble with police for faking her own kidnapping on her Twitter account. Not only did she become a trending topic, #helpfindkara, but she also launched a full police search for her.

Not surprisingly people all over the world want police to use social media more to help fight and prevent crime. At the moment the majority of officials rely on one way forms of communication such as newspapers, televisions, and radio; social media would allow them to investigate faster and more efficiently. Social media users share personal information and obviously feel comfortable sharing a lot more, if the above cases are any indication, so it only seems natural that police use that to their advantage. How do you feel about the police using social media; should they be allowed to access people’s private content on these networks?

Social Media, Politics, and You

Many researchers and journalists, such as Matthew Fraser and David Carr, believe that social media was the factor that pushed President Obama past John McCain in the 2008 election. But this presidential election is a little bit different: social media has been around longer, everyone is more used to it, and more people are using it.  So how exactly has social media changed the game of politics and the 2012 presidential election?

Must Have a Presence
Candidates, local and national, have to have a social media presence in order to win an election. This is how today’s society connects with each other, and is the easiest and most effective way for a candidate to build a relationship with voters. Right now Romney and Obama are both using Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin, and blogs to connect with the public.

Long Term Memory
Not only will comments made by the candidates through social networks never really disappear from the Internet, every comment they make through any medium, good or bad, will never completely go away. They will always be able to be found through social media; the Internet never forgets.

Instantaneous Reactions
Also, because of our ability to tweet, retweet, share, and post content all over social networks, everything moves much faster. Campaigns can respond to negative advertisements and comments made by opposition immediately through their networks. On the other side of that, if a candidate or someone within their party makes an offensive comment that can also go viral in a matter of moments.

As the campaign has already shown social media can both help and hinder candidates. Who do you think is winning the digital campaign?

For the Love of Social Media

Not so long ago in a place not too far away, my parents purchased our first desktop computer in 1998. It was a Gateway 2000 and it was glorious, or at least I thought so then.  Ever since my first experiences using the giant block of a machine I have been obsessed with being connect with people through the internet. At first it was just being able to have an AOL account and email my grandparents and cousins. Then I moved onto having an AIM account where I could leave overly dramatic away messages for my friends to see. Then Myspace became popular when I was freshman in high school and of course I was hooked on that until Facebook came along. I still use my Facebook account on the regular along with my Twitter, Linkedin, and Pinterest accounts.

It should be no surprise then that in college studying advertising I became keen on the idea of working in digital marketing and now seems to be a good time to go into it. This past summer I took the New Media Driver’s License Course, which made me love the idea of working in digital marketing even more and eventually led me to hearing about the Eco-Friendly Internship here at Ingenex.

So far being an intern here at Ingenex has been a great experience. I’m excited to continue learning more about the world of digital marketing and gain real world experience.